From our Pastor – Sat, Apr 4

April 4, 2020

Dear Friends and Members of the Swampscott Church of Spiritualism:

Wow! Who would have thought this is where we would be? Four weeks! As today marks our fourth consecutive week not meeting together, I can’t help but miss each and every one of you. In my almost twenty years at the church, I have always found our weekly connection to be one of the most valuable parts of my life. The old cliché says that “absence makes the heart grow fonder,” and that can’t be more true. In fact, this period of absence has allowed me to look deeper into myself and strengthen my spiritual core. I hope it has allowed you some spiritual reflection as well.

One thing I try to do every day is to send gratitude to our “essential workers.” There are so many amazing people who risk the personal wellness of themselves and their families while they venture off to work each day to care for all of us: humanity. To that extent, I must extrapolate a bit on what the word “essential” means; it sure is thrown around quite a bit these days.  To me, “essential” indicates an importance; yet, “essential” cannot contextualize the significance of my family and friends who are designated “essential.” Would you risk your life for others? Would you put your family in jeopardy? Can you rationally make agreements with God that if A, B, and C are taken care of, you will do X, Y, and Z? I can only imagine that these amazing, brave, and selfless individuals are making these spiritual pacts every time they choose to step into the public spectrum.  When they are asked to navigate not only their health and wellness, but also the health and wellness of others for the sake of others, they elevate their spirituality to another level: divinity.

“Divine Workers” seems much more relevant than “essential workers” at these times. After a number of weeks, these individuals should no longer be classified as “essential” but rather as “divine.”

My faith has been encouraged by the number of individuals who congregate outside of hospitals to share gratitude and the number of my students who are future health care workers taking on sixteen-hour shifts alongside grocery store clerks, postal workers, doctors, nurses, and the like. While these individuals spend each and every day going out into a world in crisis, I can only imagine that they are putting their hands into the hands of God. Likewise, my faith can only grow knowing that God is putting his love into the hands of these divine workers. While we often contemplate what love and faith is, these inspiring individuals are living examples. Thus, they are divine, and for that I say thank you!

One note of business. Going forward, we will be changing the format of our weekly lecture and meditation. Since this is new territory for us, we want to be proactive and protect the members who serve each week, and in an effort to do so, we created a password protected members only page on our website. If you are currently a member, the password will be emailed to you. If not, no problem. Please go to our website: scos.us, select the “member info” tab at the top of the page, select the “Becoming a 2020 Member” and follow the two easy steps to becoming a member.  Once we have successfully processed your membership, you will receive the password in an email. While we understand this may seem like an inconvenience for some, we are also protecting the integrity of the church by ensuring the recordings shared by our weekly lecturers and meditation speakers remain in the hands of our church membership.

While we may not be sure of what the future holds for each of us or when this remote style of living will end, I want you to know that I am holding space for each of you and your families.

Many blessings,

Rev. Jason McCuish